The Arcanomen

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Digital drawing. A machine. Large central disc at center resembling an astrolabe, but without any markings around the rim, and only one pointer. The disc is supported by one small leg at left of viewer and a larger apparatus at right with a large hand crack attached and a small spinning lever below the crank. All other parts are behind the central disc. At left are arrayed three smaller discs with hands of various shapes and lengths. Left top, a polyhedron with knobs and circular openings. Above center, three pointers. Right top, a ring facing forward orbited by three rings at vertical and symmetrical angles.

Who built it, none can now say.  The ancestors of our ancestor’s ancestors might have known.  But that knowledge—that name—was lost.  It faded from memory.  It even faded from myth.  How it was built, none can now say.  When and where it was built, none can now say. 

But what the machine was and why it was is a story that still remains in the collective memory of the people who are descended from those who lived in the Age of the Arcanomen.

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The Archivist of Farthest Star

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Archivist of Far StarTill the day of the accident, the worst part of this job was that I couldn’t tell my friends and family what I really did at the Institute.  They think I’m an intern or secretary.  I’ve been given a script of what I’m allowed to say and it purposely makes my job sound so mind-numbingly, eyelid-droopingly, attention-driftingly boring that no one will ask any follow up questions.  And that’s the point.

And till the day of the accident, the best part of my job was …everything else.

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