The Porphyrion Machine

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They went to visit him at night.  They had to.  They could not walk about by day, for the light of the sun was abhorrent to them.

Those words were taken from the writings of a nurse who resided in the town at the foot of the hills, a charming and lively town in modern times.  But steeped in accounts of strange—some say otherworldly—events from only a few generations past.  Continue reading

Anomaly Valley

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The grass is purple in that valley.  And the sky is green.  That’s how you will know that you have reached the entrance to the vault.

I never really expected those words from an ancient myth to guide me on this failed expedition.  And it was failed because even if I found the vault, even if I managed to enter it and lay my eyes on what lay within, I would never find my way out again. Continue reading

The Strange Chamber

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I brought a friend with me.  I wasn’t going into the abandoned factory alone.

Back in the day, people called it the “organ factory.”  The irony is that we have actual organ factories now.  Fabrication technology has spread farther than preservation technology ever did.  But there was a time when all we had was organ preservation.  A time when anyone who could extend the life of a donated organ by even just a bit could save lives that would otherwise have been lost. Continue reading

The Black Dwarf Star

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Once upon a time, there was a thriving civilization living under the light of a warm yellow sun.  As eons passed, the civilization spread.  It advanced.  It regressed.  It advanced again.  It rose.  It declined.  And it rose again.  It changed, became unrecognizable from its past self.  And as the civilization did, so did the sun that burned above it and smiled down upon it.  The warm yellow sun was aging, and as it did, it grew warmer and warmer, and bigger and bigger, darker and darker, yellow to orange to red, until the smiling yellow sun became a glaring red giant. Continue reading

Prosopokaf’s Fusion Cream

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Audrey got home late most nights, and to break up the endless cycle of go-to-work-come-home-conk-out-repeat, she would immerse herself in faraway and fantastical worlds.  She would do this by watching her favorite channel.  Considering the subject matter of the programming—adventures in mythical lands, life aboard a galactic cruiser crewed by hundreds of sentient species, and so on—it came as no surprise that some of the advertising skewed toward the fantastical. Continue reading