Storyfeather Year 7

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This week’s story will be posted soon. This is the anniversary post for Storyfeather’s seventh year!

The Year of Prompts is done! That was the theme for Storyfeather Year Seven.  Take a writing prompt and write a short story from it.      

Thank you to everyone who read even a single story. Thank to you everyone who liked or commented. Thank you for your time and interest, and for being a part of Storyfeather, especially Year Seven.

A lot happens in the seventh year stories.  An inventor builds a time machine out of a jukebox.  Three friends do their science project on a forgotten novelty invention, a self-peeling banana. A small team of marine explorers search for a mythical jewel that fell from the heavens. A family is haunted by a demon that is not satisfied with collecting the fallen teeth of their children. And a young drummer commits the crime of “creativity without a license.”

I’ve written over 350 stories now. And I posted my 150th podcast episode (I’ll soon be wrapping up Season Three, in which I’m narrating stories from Storyfeather Year Three).  Year Seven was a worthy challenge, but I’m glad to be moving on.  Sometimes I “cheated” and deviated by just writing a story based on a dream or a notion (and reverse-engineering some kind of prompt from that).  It’s easy to find writing prompts.  There are free apps and sites.  But what I found challenging was to find a prompt with the proper level of specificity.

Storytelling is still my true love, still my destiny, still my path.  And this year in particular, storytelling has been and still is my haven.  And my hope.

Year Eight is on the horizon.  Here’s to seeing what stories I’ll be spinning up (that’s a dorky clue to the theme).  I hope you’ll come along.

I have stories to tell you.
Nila

The Children of the Rain and the Sun

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When they were young, the seven children of the Rain and the Sun were inseparable.  They were magnificent, these children.  When they were born, so too were colors born into the world.  And the colors bore the names of the seven children.  Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, and Violet.

What each child touched became that color.  The red petals of a rose, the orange cheeks of a young fairy, the green spires of a pine, the indigo eye of a peacock’s feather.  They would join hands and skip through the world, coloring as they went. Continue reading

When Sun and Moon Fled the Sky

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Mischievous, capricious, boisterous Sun never took her cosmic duty seriously in her younger days.

Many cast light upon the mortal world, but only one, only Sun cast warmth upon the mortal world.

For Sun was always laughing.  Always.  And her great warmth came from her perpetual laughter.

Her elder sister, Moon, cast a light that was calming and dim enough to let other lights shine, like the stars and the planets. Continue reading

The Everyday God Who Wished To Sleep

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A tale was once told among the ancestors of the people who live at the base of the great mountain to the north, from which a waterfall plummets into a river that winds across the land.  The people who now live in that rich and lovely place still remember the tale of how and why their ancestors’ hearts once grew still and frigid.  And they still remember what part the everyday gods played in the tale.

~***~ Continue reading

The Thorn Clock

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When her auntie died, far sooner than she should have, Subira inherited three things from her.  One was a blessing.  One was a curse.  The third was a quest.  The curse is what killed her aunt.  And the curse would kill Subira too unless she completed the quest before the number on the clock that her aunt gave her reached one thousand and six. Continue reading